Recommendations by cabin owners and experts

The Best Board Games

The Best Board Games

The Ultimate List of Board Games for the Cabin

Did you know that board games are making a major comeback, as well as being very good for you? Over the last year, board game purchases have increased an astounding 30% and there are many reasons why.  The first, and most important one is that people are simply getting sick of the nastiness of the Internet, and the mindless way that we watch kids play games on their phones.

Bonus: Super Deals on Amazon for Toys!

Here are a few specific reasons you should play board games:

  • Board Games promote family time.  They are interactive and time-consuming.  Instead of closing off to the world, you engage with friends and family.
  • They improve your brain function and memory skills.
  • Board Games promote laughter. Study after study link laughing to good health and a long life.
  • The up and down excitement of board games help release endorphins, which not only make you feel good, but also helps to lower your blood pressure.
  • They decrease your risk of mental illness and mental decay later in life.
  • Board Games help reduce stress. They are wonderful breaks from our daily stresses.
  • The positive feelings you get from playing board games help depression.
  • They improve socialization skills in both young people and adults.

The Best Board Games for the Cabin:

(in no particular order)

Chess

Chess is a board game for two players. It is played in a square board, made of 64 smaller squares, with eight squares on each side. Each player starts with sixteen pieces: eight pawns, two knights, two bishops, two rooks, one queen and one king. The goal of the game is for each player to try to checkmate the king of the opponent. Checkmate is a threat (‘check’) to the opposing king which no move can stop. It ends the game.

During the game the two opponents take turns to move one of their pieces to a different square of the board. One player (‘White’) has pieces of a light color; the other player (‘Black’) has pieces of a dark color. There are rules about how pieces move, and about taking the opponent’s pieces off the board. The player with white pieces always makes the first move. Because of this, White has a small advantage, and wins more often than Black in tournament games.

Our Favorite Chess Set: Chess Armory 15″ Wooden Chess Set with Felted Game Board Interior for Storage

Gorgeous Rustic Chess Set: Naturally Med – Olive Wood Rustic Chess Set – 20 inch diameter – with pieces

Coolest Chess Set: 17″ Fantasy Good Vs. Evil 3D Chess Set, Bronze & Silver Tone

Checkers

Checkers, also called draughts, board game, one of the world’s oldest games. Checkers is played by two persons who oppose each other across a board of 64 light and dark squares, the same as a chessboard. The 24 playing pieces are disk-shaped and of contrasting colors (whatever their colors, they are identified as black and white). At the start of the game, each contestant has 12 pieces arranged on the board. While the actual playing is always done on the dark squares, the board is often shown in reverse for clarity. The notation used in describing the game is based on numbering the squares on the board. The black pieces always occupy squares 1 to 12, and the white pieces invariably rest on squares 21 to 32.

Classic Checkers Set: Continuum Games Checkers, One Size

Giant Checkers!: Brybelly Giant 3-in-1 Checkers and Mega Tic Tac Toe with Reversible Rug

Trivial Pursuit

Trivial Pursuit is the original trivia game that started it all.

Each player has a circular playing piece with six pie-shaped holes. The goal of the game is to collect a pie in each color. The colors correspond to different question categories.

The board consists of a circular track with spaces in seven different colors. Six of the colors correspond to question categories while the last color gives a new dice roll. Six spaces along the track are “pie spaces”, and from these there are “spokes” of track leading to the middle of the board.

Players roll a die and move along the track in any direction they like. When a player stops on a color they get a question of the appropriate category. If the player answers a question correctly while on a pie space, they get a pie of that color (assuming they don’t already have it). A correct answer on another square allows the player to roll again.

Once the player has one pie in each color, she can move along the spokes to the middle of the board to win the game.

Classic Trivial Pursuit: Trivial Pursuit Game: Classic Edition

Shop Various Editions of Trivial Pursuit

Clue

Clue is a murder mystery game for three to six players, devised by Anthony E. Pratt from Birmingham, England. The game was first manufactured by Waddingtons in the UK in 1949. Since then, it has been relaunched and updated several times, and it is currently owned and published by the American game and toy company Hasbro. The object of the game is to determine who murdered the game’s victim (“Dr. Black” in the UK version and “Mr. Boddy” in North American versions), where the crime took place, and which weapon was used. Each player assumes the role of one of the six suspects, and attempts to deduce the correct answer by strategically moving around a game board representing the rooms of a mansion and collecting clues about the circumstances of the murder from the other players.

Classic Clue Game: Retro Series Clue 1986 Edition Game

Game of Thrones Clue: CLUE: Game of Thrones Board Game

Stratego

Stratego is a strategy board game for two players on a board of 10×10 squares. Each player controls 40 pieces representing individual officer ranks in an army. The pieces have Napoleonic insignia. The objective of the game is to find and capture the opponent’s Flag, or to capture so many enemy pieces that the opponent cannot make any further moves. Stratego has simple enough rules for young children to play, but a depth of strategy that is also appealing to adults. The game is a slightly modified copy of an early 20th century French game named L’Attaque. It has been in production in Europe since World War II and the United States since 1961. There are now 2- and 4-handed versions, versions with 10, 30 or 40 pieces per player, and boards with smaller sizes (number of spaces). There are also variant pieces and different rulesets.

Original Stratego: Stratego Original Battlefield Strategy Game (3 Variations)

Risk

Take over the world in this game of strategy conquest, now with updated figures and improved Mission cards. In the Risk game, the goal is simple: players aim to conquer their enemies’ territories by building an army, moving their troops in, and engaging in battle. Depending on the roll of the dice, a player will either defeat the enemy or be defeated. This exciting game is filled with betrayal, alliances, and surprise attacks. On the battlefield, anything goes! Defeat all of the enemy troops in a territory to conquer that territory and get one step closer to global conquest! The player who completes his or her secret mission first — and reveals the Secret Mission card to prove it — wins. And remember…when it comes to taking over the world, it’s all about who is willing to take the biggest Risk.

Original Game: Risk Game

Winter is Coming! GOT Version: Risk: Game of Thrones Board Game

Battleship

Battleship is the classic naval combat game that brings together competition, strategy, and excitement. In head-to-head battle, you search for the enemy’s fleet of ships and destroy them one by one. No ship is safe in this game of stealth and suspense. Try to protect your own fleet while you annihilate your opponent’s. It’s a battle that you must win!

Battleship: Battleship Game

Movie Edition: Deluxe Battleship Movie Edition Game

Sorry!

Sorry! is a board game that is based on the ancient cross and circle game Pachisi. Players try to travel around the board with their pieces faster than any other player. Originally manufactured by W.H. Storey & Co in England and now by Hasbro, Sorry! is marketed for two to four players, ages six through adult. The game title comes from the many ways in which a player can negate the progress of another, while issuing an apologetic “Sorry!”

Sorry! 2013 Edition Game

The Game of Life

The Game of Life, also known simply as Life, is a board game originally created in 1860 by Milton Bradley, as The Checkered Game of Life. The Game of Life was America’s first popular parlour game. The game simulates a person’s travels through his or her life, from college to retirement, with jobs, marriage, and possible children along the way. Two to six players can participate in one game. Variations of the game accommodate eight to ten players.

The modern version was originally published 100 years later, in 1960. It was created and co-designed by toy and game designer Reuben Klamer and was “heartily endorsed” by Art Linkletter. It is now part of the permanent collection of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History and an inductee into the National Toy Hall of Fame. It later spawned a book, The Game of Life: How to Succeed in Real Life No Matter Where You Land (Running Press), by Lou Harry.

Hasbro The Game of Life Game

Backgammon

Backgammon is a game for two players, played on a board consisting of twenty-four narrow triangles called points. The triangles alternate in color and are grouped into four quadrants of six triangles each. The quadrants are referred to as a player’s home board and outer board, and the opponent’s home board and outer board. The home and outer boards are separated from each other by a ridge down the center of the board called the bar.

Classic Backgammon Set: 18 inch Leatherette Backgammon set with Beautiful Old World Map Design

Premium Set (Stunning): 21″ Crimea Backgammon Set. Crimean Sea Ship. Russian Board. Leather Pieces. 

Axis and Allies

Axis & Allies is a series of World War II strategy board games. Originally designed by Larry Harris and published by Nova Game Designs in 1981, the game was republished by the Milton Bradley Company in 1984 as part of the Gamemaster Series of board games. This edition has been retroactively named Axis & Allies: Classic to differentiate it from later revisions. In 1996, Axis & Allies: Classic was inducted into the Academy of Adventure Gaming Arts & Design Adventure Gaming Hall of Fame. Games magazine also has inducted Axis & Allies into their buyers’ guide Hall of Fame, an honor the magazine extends to “games that have met or exceeded the highest standards of quality and play value and have been continuously in production for at least 10 years; i.e., classics.”

Classic Edition: Axis and Allies 1941 Board Game

Shop Various Editions of Axis and Allies

Scattergories

Scattergories is a creative-thinking category-based party game originally published by Parker Brothers in 1988. Parker Brothers was purchased by Hasbro a few years later, and they published the game internationally under their Milton Bradley brand. The objective of the 2-to-6-player game is to score points by uniquely naming objects within a set of categories, given an initial letter, within a time limit.

Scattergories Game

Operation

Operation is a battery-operated game of physical skill that tests players’ hand-eye coordination and fine motor skills. The game’s prototype was invented in 1964 by John Spinello, a University of Illinois industrial design student at the time, who sold his rights to the game to Milton Bradley for a sum of USD $500 and the promise of a job upon graduation. Initially produced by Milton Bradley in 1965, Operation is currently made by Hasbro, with an estimated franchise worth of USD $40 million.

The game is a variant on the old-fashioned electrified wire loop game popular at funfairs around the United States. It consists of an “operating table”, lithographed with a comic likeness of a patient (nicknamed “Cavity Sam”) with a large red lightbulb for his nose. In the surface are a number of openings, which reveal cavities filled with fictional and humorously named ailments made of plastic. The general gameplay requires players to remove these plastic ailments with a pair of tweezers without touching the edge of the cavity opening.

Classic Edition: Classic Operation Game

Candy Land

Candy Land (also Candyland) is a simple racing board game currently published by Hasbro. The game requires no reading and minimal counting skills, making it suitable for young children. Due to the design of the game, there is no strategy involved: players are never required to make choices, just follow directions. The winner is predetermined by the shuffle of the cards.

Candy Land The World of Sweets Game

Scrabble

Scrabble is a word game in which two to four players score points by placing tiles bearing a single letter onto a board divided into a 15×15 grid of squares. The tiles must form words which, in crossword fashion, read left to right in rows or downwards in columns, and be defined in a standard dictionary or lexicon.

The game is played by two to four players on a square board with a 15×15 grid of cells (individually known as “squares”), each of which accommodates a single letter tile. In official club and tournament games, play is between two players or, occasionally, between two teams each of which collaborates on a single rack.

The board is marked with “premium” squares, which multiply the number of points awarded: eight dark red “triple-word” squares, 17 pale red “double-word” squares, of which one, the center square (H8), is marked with a star or other symbol; 12 dark blue “triple-letter” squares, and 24 pale blue “double-letter” squares.

Classic Game: Hasbro Scrabble Crossword Game

Elegant Edition: Scrabble Onyx Edition

Boggle

Boggle is a word game played using a plastic grid of lettered dice, in which players attempt to find words in sequences of adjacent letters.

The game begins by shaking a covered tray of 16 cubic dice, each with a different letter printed on each of its sides. The dice settle into a 4×4 tray so that only the top letter of each cube is visible. After they have settled into the grid, a three-minute sand timer is started and all players simultaneously begin the main phase of play.

Each player searches for words that can be constructed from the letters of sequentially adjacent cubes, where “adjacent” cubes are those horizontally, vertically, and diagonally neighboring. Words must be at least three letters long, may include singular and plural (or other derived forms) separately, but may not use the same letter cube more than once per word. Each player records all the words he or she finds by writing on a private sheet of paper. After three minutes have elapsed, all players must immediately stop writing and the game enters the scoring phase.

Bigger, Better Version: Super Big Boggle

Monopoly

Monopoly is a board game that originated in the United States in 1903 as a way to demonstrate that an economy which rewards wealth creation is better than one in which monopolists work under few constraints and to promote the economic theories of Henry George and in particular his ideas about taxation.

Monopoly was first published by Parker Brothers in 1935. Currently subtitled “The Fast-Dealing Property Trading Game”, the game is named after the economic concept of monopoly—the domination of a market by a single entity. It is now owned and produced by the American game and toy company Hasbro. Players move around the game-board buying, trading, or selling properties, developing their properties with houses and hotels, and collecting rent from their opponents, with the goal being to drive them all into bankruptcy, leaving one monopolist in control of the economy. Since the board game was first commercially sold in the 1930s, it has become a part of popular world culture, having been locally licensed in more than 103 countries and printed in more than thirty-seven languages.

Original Version: Monopoly Board Game The Classic Edition

Shop Various Editions of Monopoly

Uno

Uno is an American card game that is played with a specially printed deck (see Mau Mau for an almost identical game played with normal playing cards).

The aim of the game is to be the first player to score 500 points, achieved (usually over several rounds of play) by a player discarding all of their cards and earning points corresponding to the value of the remaining cards still held by the other players.

The deck consists of 108 cards, of which there are 25 of each color (red, green, blue, and yellow), each color having two of each rank except zero. The ranks in each color are zero to nine, “Skip”, “Draw Two”, and “Reverse” (the last three being “action cards”). In addition, the deck contains four each of “Wild” and “Wild Draw Four” cards.

Uno Deluxe

Yahtzee

Yahtzee is a dice game made by Milton Bradley (now owned by Hasbro), which was first marketed as “Yatzie” by the National Association Service of Toledo, Ohio, in the early 1940s. The object of the game is to score points by rolling five dice to make certain combinations. The dice can be rolled up to three times in a turn to try to make various scoring combinations. A game consists of thirteen rounds. After each round the player chooses which scoring category is to be used for that round. Once a category has been used in the game, it cannot be used again. The scoring categories have varying point values, some of which are fixed values and others where the score depends on the value of the dice. A Yahtzee is five-of-a-kind and scores 50 points; the highest of any category. The winner is the player who scores the most points.

Classic Game: Winning Moves Games Yahtzee Classic An Exciting Game Of Skill And Chance

Chinese Checkers

Chinese checkers is a strategy board game of German origin (named “Sternhalma”) which can be played by two, three, four, or six people, playing individually or with partners. The game is a modern and simplified variation of the American game Halma.

The objective is to be first to race all of one’s pieces across the hexagram-shaped board into “home”—the corner of the star opposite one’s starting corner—using single-step moves or moves that jump over other pieces. The remaining players continue the game to establish second-, third-, fourth-, fifth-, and last-place finishers. The rules are simple, so even young children can play.

Classic Game Setup: Chinese Checkers with Marbles

Beautiful Black Walnut Set: Wooden Marble Game Board – Chinese Checkers – Oiled -18″ Circle, Black Walnut

Dominos

Dominoes is a family of games played with rectangular “domino” tiles. Each domino is a rectangular tile with a line dividing its face into two square ends. Each end is marked with a number of spots (also called pips, nips, or dobs) or is blank. The backs of the dominoes in a set are indistinguishable, either blank or having some common design. The domino gaming pieces (colloquially nicknamed bones, cards, tiles, tickets, stones, chips, or spinners[dubious – discuss]) make up a domino set, sometimes called a deck or pack. The traditional Sino-European domino set consists of 28 dominoes, featuring all combinations of spot counts between zero and six. A domino set is a generic gaming device, similar to playing cards or dice, in that a variety of games can be played with a set.

Nice Classic Set: Cardinal Double 12 Color Dot Dominoes in Collectors Tin 

Dominos “Trains” Game: Mexican Train Dominoes

 




We recommend the new Amazon grocery delivery service. Great for cabin owners:



Also published on Medium.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail